The Croissant: Easy To Enjoy, Hard To Make? Try It Out Yourself With These 5 Recipes.

tym-article-french-month2-food1

Croissant: The Puff Piece
If you like French puff pastry, nothing beats a croissant. That flaky, buttery, melt-in-your mouth pastry, best enjoyed with a cup of coffee, is easy to love but hard to make. Or is it? We’ve scoured the web for a selection of interesting croissant blogs and recipes – from hobbyists to professional bakers. Bon appétit!

1. Croissant, everything about it
tym-article-french-month2-food2From: http://the-wandering-girl.blogspot.sg/2011/12/croissant-everything-about-it.html

If a 16-year-old (now 18!) French girl can do it, so can you. This Wandering Girl recipe explains the importance of working with the right dough, and of using real butter, and even goes into the history of the croissant. The site is in both English and French, written by a young girl with joie de vivre (keen enjoyment of life) and a genuine love of baking.

Tip: “The final act [to making croissants], the key to success, [is] the ‘sound of croissant’, says P.Hermé. [You should] feel the crumbs falling between your fingers, and enjoy the oh-so-delicious smell, and its scent.”

2. Julia Childs Croissant Recipe
tym-article-french-month2-food3From: http://goodiegirl.wordpress.com/2010/04/18/julia-childs-croissant-recipe/

This is a recipe from Baking With Julia pastry chef Esther McManus, who trained in France, Italy, Israel, and America, and has her own bakery in Philadelphia. Blogger Goodie Girls watched the entire Baking With Julia episode featuring Esther McManus on PBS online and recreated it in her own kitchen to get the recipe. Julia Child would be proud.

Tip: “Just to let you know…the folding steps are very important as this is what gives the croissant the layers and flakes. If these processes are skipped, you will not get croissants.”

3. Classic French Croissant Recipe
tym-article-french-month2-food4From: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/classic-french-croissant-recipe/

Croissant is “all about the layers”, according to this painstakingly detailed recipe, but the results are worth it. This is a serious site for the casual home baker – complete with links to their own video on how to make a croissant. The bloggers admit the croissant is difficult to perfect (they even keep a croissant log), but practice, as they say, makes perfect.

TIP: “Each laminating step should not take more than a few minutes. However if, due to initial inexperience for example, it should take you longer, you can fold your dough letter style, cover it and refrigerate it for 20 minutes and continue the rolling process after this rest. It is very important the butter stays solid.”

4. How to make croissants. [And lose your mind while doing it]
tym-article-french-month2-food5From: http://www.howsweeteats.com/2011/09/how-to-make-croissants-and-lose-your-mind-while-doing-it/

Inspired by nostalgia of childhood summers spent with grandma indulging in the buttery pastry, the author sets out to make croissants at home and discovers it takes 14 hours to make one! In a funny, informative post, the author shares the journey to creating the ultimate homemade croissant, complete with photos of just about every step. Just so you know you’re doing it wrong.

TIP: “I’m not about to tell you ‘Oh! Croissants are SO easy! You can totally do it!’ because seriously… they are not. However, I think it is similar to roasting a chicken – the first time sucks the life out of you but it gets easier and more enjoyable time after time after time. At least that’s what I’m hoping. Plus, the end result is totally worth it and you know I’m not just saying that.”

5. A recipe for easy croissants made in one day
tym-article-french-month2-food6From: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/19699/do-you-know-how-make-excellent-croissants-minimum-effort

From a community site for amateur bakers and artisan bread enthusiasts comes this surprisingly detailed, step-by-step reply to the question: Do you know how to make excellent croissants with minimum effort? The response from ‘lazybaker’ is anything but lazy, complete with photos and enough instructions to rival a professional cookbook.

TIP: “Work in a cold room. Best thing to work on the croissants in the morning when the weather is cool. You can test by holding the butter in your hand. If the butter is malleable and doesn’t melt, then it’s a good room temperature to work in. If it’s too warm or hot, don’t bother making croissants.”

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